Community for F# Activity

My consistency with running the Community for F# over the last year or so has been lacking, to say the least. I’ve spread myself too thin working on various open source projects, mostly relating to pushing OWIN. Now that work is (mostly) done, I plan on re-focusing on driving the Community for F# early next year. I’ve already started trying to line up speakers for the first six months. Unfortunately, we’ll miss December and possibly even January, as Google changed their +Pages to My Business and dropped Hangouts support, so far as I can tell. I need to sort that out.

As exciting as that is to some of you, I am most excited about the new web application that is currently under development. It looks like a slightly broken version of the site you can currently find at http://c4fsharp.net/, but if you look through the issues, you will find a lot of exciting new features coming to you in 2016. Here’s a short list:

  1. Video feed – pull all F#-related videos from the YouTube and Vimeo channels into a searchable list
  2. User groups and Events – move the work Reed Copsey built to list F# user groups and events into a proper data store with an admin interface for people to add more; also, possibly pull events and groups from meetup.com and lanyrd.com
  3. Searchable dojo list – similar to the above for the list of dojos
  4. Community wishlist – allow users to submit and promote the things they would really like to see added to F# or its ecosystem; essentially an improved UserVoice
  5. Community ratings – add ratings or at least a “Like” button to every piece of content
  6. A fresh re-design of the site to better accommodate the content

Possibly the most exciting news is that this web app refresh will become a showcase for F# web development. I’ve started building the new web application with Suave and WebSharper, and I have plans to add Freya. I also started writing a GitBook that will explain how the site was developed and the decisions made in selecting each implementation, as well as why other technologies were not selected. I hope this book provides some guidance to those looking to build web apps with F# and struggling to understand how to proceed.

If you are interested in helping with any of these things, please reach out. Community for F# is driven by a handful of very busy volunteers, and we could definitely use more help. Not only do I have big dreams for improving the web app, but we need help managing the Twitter account, finding and scheduling speakers and hangouts, managing the much neglected LinkedIn page, and more.

I would like to especially thank Mathias Brandewinder and Reed Copsey for their help in expanding and pushing the Community for F# forward. I would also like to thank the presenters who have agreed to do Live Meetings and Hangouts with us.

Lastly, thank you to all the local user group organizers and presenters! We have been honored this year by those that allowed us to stream their content, especially the Portland F# Meetup Group, the San Francisco F# User Group, and the F# Seattle User Group. If you would like to partner with the Community for F# to stream your group’s meetings, please reach out.

Thanks for a terrific 2015, and here’s to an exciting 2016!

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